Prunus serotina, The Cherry

Prunus serotina, The Cherry 

  Description of the Cherry Tree in the South West

   Prunus serotina, the uncivilized cherry of the western mountains, is a expensive part of my Materia Medica. Prunus serotina refers to ‘prunus’ the grecian word ‘prunos’-plum or cherry and ‘serotina’ the latin word ‘serus’- late maturing crop. Ironically it blooms in early rise in the mountains of the toward the ~ west. It is found in foggy moist north facing canyons. It has striking beautiful flower and adorns the tree conspicuously by white dreamy blossoms.

      Prunus serotina is a part of the Rose or Rosaceae house. In the southwest US it is often straggly and srubby, with deciduous foliage bright green above, when the leaves are crushed it has a distinguishing ‘almond’ fragrance with a slight mention of cherry. When the tree is crowded it have power to grow tall and slender with a sharp life span. The leaves have a ponted donation, finely serrated, alternate, simple. The flowers are pranked out and move fast in the principle, occurring before the leaves have grown to replete size. They are white on a extended raceme and are such fragrant you can sometimes smell the incense wafting on the wind before sighting the tree. The yelp is distinctive, when young there are unimportant arcs of grey circling the central chord of the smooth shiny trunk. When older the bay takes on a mottled grey scabrous exterior, looking very different than the agreeable bark of younger spindly trees.

      It occurs in North America widely in the eastern states. I have walked through the expanded distinctive deciduous forests with maple in the Alleghey mountains in western Pennsylvania. There in Pennsylvania it presents for example a large great tree of measure and size. In the western sphere of Arizona and New Mexico, it is a middle- to higher elevation shrub to narrow-minded tree, ocassionaly getting to size but rare to see. Often found in umbrageous canyons with Quercus (oaks) in dank riparian zones.

      The bark of wild cherry was listed in the US Pharmacopeia from 1820- 1970. It was used extensively through Native North American people across the latitude of its growth. The early pioneers large knowledge and interacting with these people moreover prized wild cherry bark for coughs and in the same manner with a mild sedative. It has each uninterrupted use by folk herbalists, similar as myself into the present light of ~.

      The familiar have a smack and flavor of wild cherry bay is used in the familiar cough drops and cough syrup. Dr DeWitt’s cough and devoid of warmth syrup from 1930 contained horehound, seaman, wild cherry, glycerine, alcohol 5%, and gum Arabic. It was marketed through W J Parker Company. Smith Brothers developed a uniform cherry cough drop in 1928, the pattern flavor although secret, had a dark licorice extract content. In addition to being the in actual process ingredient cherry bark also took in c~tinuance a dubious role in disguising a expanded range of ingredients from, laudanum, a flowing opiod to codeine, heroin and cocaine in manifest medicines in the early part of the 20th centenary.

       The bay of Prunus serotina contains a remote range of active medicinal chemicals including: Amygdalin: anti-inflammatory, antitussive, anti spasmodic, expectorant
Gallic sharp: analgesic, anti flu, astringent, Bronchodilator
Prunasin:cyanogenic, aldose reductase inhibitor, uterosedative, bronchorelaxant
Scopolletin: anti wheezy, cns-stimulant,
 Tannin: hepatoprotective, antiviral, anticancer,

 Dr Duke’s Phytochemical and ethnobotanical database
https://phytochem.nal.usda.gov/phytochem/plants/splendor/1597#act-42946-close 

Cherry in Herbal learning

      “The cherry at the same time that a single image was frequently the cupid-cherry;as such it survives today in American low language as ‘the maidenhead’ . Erotic meaning was there for the makar to practice if he wished. But the cherry was enrapturing fruit. It was the object of strong desire in the Mother of God preceding Christ was born-in the well known ‘Cherry tree Carol’ that is a change on the early legend of Mary and the be ~d palm on the flight to Egypt…There was that in the temper of the cherry, the white and red of it’s man and juice, that could eloquently form the body and blood of Christ, of the sacrament.”
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Song, Dance and Poetry of the Court of Scotland Under King James VI By Helena Mennnie Shire, Cambridge University Press, 2010

      “I apprehend there are few but know this tree, on account of its fruit’s sake; and therefore I shall spare writing a explanation thereof.

Place : For the place of its putting out, it is afforded room in each orchard.

Government and virtues : It is a tree of Venus. Cherries, for the re~on that they are of different tastes, likewise they are of different qualities. The pleasant pass through the stomach and the depth more speedily, but are of in some degree nourishment; the tart or sour are greater quantity pleasing to an hot stomach, compass appetite to meat, to help and divide tough phlegm, and gross humours; boundary when these are dried, they are besides binding to the belly than then they are fresh, being cooling in excitable diseases, and welcome to the tolerate, and provokes urine. The gum of the Cherry-tree, desolved in wine is expert for a cold, cough, and raucity of the throat; mends the colour in the part, sharpens the eyesight, provokes appetite, and helps to weaken and expel the stone, and dissolved, the water thereof is much used to tame the stone, and to expel stagger and wind.”

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Nicholas Culpepper The Complete Herbal 1653

 Sir Cleges, Knight of the in a circuit table and the Cherry:

      Sir Cleges was a knight of the round table. The narration of Sir Cleges, translated by Jessie L Weston, 2000, Sir Cleges from one side his generosity and gifting to the smaller quantity fortunate became poor. Gradually after a time course of life in poverty he was forgotten ~ means of those to whom his generosity shined and ~ dint of. and by he was left unbidden to the King Uther Pendragon’s palace and court. Uther Pendragon, the venerable man of King Authur was having a sumptuous repast at Christmastide. Sir Cleges was again univited and forgotten. Not without gifts he took relief from his ever faithful, loving wife Dame Clarys. Sir Cleges in the manner that a devout Christian had pledged his feal loyality both to King Pendragon and the Queen of Heaven, the Most Blessed Virgin.

He sought revealed the interseccion of the Virgin Mary. While he was praying with less than a cherry tree at Christmas concurrence of influences, he looked up and and lifting his acme was struck on the head ~ dint of. a cherry branch thick and heavy with fruit in late December. “
      “Dear God,” spoke he, “what manner of berry may this be that grows at this time of the year? At this conjuncture I know not that any tree should hold fruit.”” Sir Cleges presented the cherries to his wife in thankful good-will for comforting him and then resolute to take them to the King Pendragon, ancestor of King Arthur. After first core rejected by the keepers of the court he persevered and was proficient to present them to the monarch. The king rewarded Sir Cleges through gifts and a return of his prestige in the midst of his peers with a place in the court.

 American Eclectics and light-headed Cherry Bark:

      Within the American Eclectics, cherry bark was esteemed as a complex remedy with a wide variety of close attention, in the American Eclectic practice of Medicine, Volume 2, by Ichabod Gibson Jones, 1858. “
      “I require also usually administered at the sort time tablespoonful doses, two or three seasons a day, of a decoction of ferocious-cherry bark and sanguinaria, which, in cases allied with debility of the stomach, self-reliance rarely fail to produce highly beneficial movables, and should be continued for more time after the healthy secretion of the liver has been restored. Its influence upon the biliary secretion obviates the exigency for constantly resorting to cathartics, and it should at no time be neglected except in those cases presenting evidence of gastric irritation, when the fiery fellow-root should be omitted and the cherry bark be given alone.”
        Ichabod Jones was document here of cherry bark given taken in the character of a treatment for jaundice and a stuck liver. Another Eclectic model using wild cherry bark, this common from Lorenzo ElbridgeJ ones, The American Eclectic Materia Medica, 1863, was to mix Berberis bark, Aspen bark and visionary cherry bark.” Infuse Barberry bark, Wild-cherry bark and American Aspen, four ounces of either , in one gallon of cider on this account that forty-eight hours in a covered vessel, maintaining a gentle heat: one haymaids may be taken four or five epochs daily, in jaundice and torpid states of the liver.”
      Prunus serotina bark is not used much now in the place of jaundice or liver issues. Yet these 19th century eclectic’s use of it in this regular course bears careful consideration for the new herbalist.
      Ichabod Jones, describes Prunus Spp bark as ‘aromatic tonic, astringent and tranquillizing.’ Both indicated in irritable inclination and nervous system. In addition he describes it beneficial to uses in chronic bronchitis, phithisis what one. is an old term for tuberculosis. Frequently with what we would now call ‘shortness of breath’, as occurs in COPD and exacerbations of asthma, and influenza there is anxiety.      
       Wild cherry bay is useful then as now in addressing concern connected to breathing. Wild cherry cite is a valuable ingredient in my materia medica. I ungoverned craft it from the pristine dank mountains here in the southwest bioregion of mountains and Sky islands. I protuberance it immediately in organic cane pure spirit to preserve its medicinal aromatic properties. I occur it as a pure fresh put in the ground tincture and in formulas.
      It combines well through Aralia racemosa, spikenard, Osha, Ligusticum porteri, American Licorice, Glycyrrhiza lepidota, Monarda spp, Lomatium, Asclepias spp and other southwest bioregional respiratory herbs. In addition it lends itself to being an ally, not only for coughs and respiratory issues.
     “Therapy—The key influence of this agent is further markedly apparent when it is administered in sickness of the respiratory apparatus of a subacute or chronic character. It is not given for the period of the active period of acute cases, nevertheless is of value during the termination of convalescence. It is a frequent remedy in the treatment of chronic coughs, especially those accompanied with immoderate expectoration. It is valuable in whooping-cough. The syrup is used since a menstruum for the administration of other remedies in this illness. It is excellent also in ~ed cough—the cough of nervous patients exclusively of apparent cause. The syrup may subsist used persistently in phthisis, for the direction of many other agents which appear to be to be indicated during the way of the disease. Wild cherry is plain in the treatment of mild cases of pulsation, especially those of a functional reputation, or from reflex causes. Palpitation from disturbed terms of the stomach is directly relieved by it. It is said to take a direct tonic influence upon the centre of circulation when the muscular structure of that means of communication is greatly weakened, where there is spreading or valvular insufficiency, especially if induced ~ dint of. prolonged gastric or pulmonary disease.”
–John Uri Lloyd

       Prunus serotina resonates grave into the body energizing the largest gland in the visible form, the liver. Especially in terms of inactivity and stagnation. It’s interesting to penetrate herbalists today describe cherry bark almost exclusively for cough and respiratory issues. Both the selecting physicians acknowledge this use yet indorse its use internally not connected through cough. Perhaps the best way of describing these broader lie of uses is the description of violent cherry bark as a blood purifyer and first note of the scale. Native American tribes also used the bark topically for sores, internally for diarrhea and digestive issues and with respect to ‘old’ coughs, and during the primitive stages of a woman’s labor. The selecting physicians of America felt strongly its employment in jaundice/liver issues in etc. to respiratory problems, along with cough and vexation related to shortness of breath.
      “As a restoration for dyspepsia it has many advocates. It is a key to the stomach improving digestion through stimulating the action of the of the stomach glands. It soothes irritability of the inclination from whatever cause. Although the properties of a brace sedative are not ascribed to this active element, general nervous irritation is soothed through its administration, nervous irritability of the brook and of the respiratory organs is allayed, and a key-note influence is imparted to the central irritable system.” –John Uri Lloyd
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 American Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Pharmacognosy JOHN URI LLOYD, Ph.M, 1915

      “The officinal portion is the bark, and that of the root should be preferred to that of the trunk and branches. It should be renewed by the year, as its properties are much impaired by age and drying.” “Properties and Uses.—Wild-cherry yelp has a tonic and stimulating control on the digestive apparatus, and a simultaneous soothing action on the nervous system and diffusion. It is, therefore, valuable in all those cases where it is eligible to give tone and strength to the plan, without, at the same time, causing over great an action of the affections and blood vessels, as, during convalescence from pleurisy, pneumonia, acute hepatitis, and other incendiary and febrile diseases. It is too useful in hectic fever, cough, colliquative diarrhea, more forms of dyspepsia, whooping-cough, excitability of the nervous system, etc., and has been construct an excellent palliative in phthisis.”
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The American Dispensatory, By John King

       “Prunus Virginiana— Pruni Virginianae—Wild Cherry. U. S. P. Origin.—The bay, collected in autumn, of Prunus serotina Ehr, a large forest tree indigenous in North America. Description and Properties.—It is met with in curved pieces or irregular fragments -fa inch (2 Mm.) or more thick; external surface greenish-brown or yellowish-brown, deceptive and somewhat glossy, marked with transverse scars. If the bark is collected from the of long date wood and deprived of the corky bed., the outer surface is nut-brown and odd; inner surface somewhat striate or fissured. Upon softening in water it develops a well-defined bitter-almond odor. Taste astringent, fragrant, and bitter. It contains a vivacious oil, hydrocyanic acid, tannin, a like gall glucoside, resin, etc. Dose.—i-i drachm (2.0-4.0 Gm.).”
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 A TEXT-BOOK MATERIA MEDICA, THERAPEUTICS, AND PHARMACOLOGY. GEORGE FRANK BUTLER, Ph.g.. M.D., , 1896

       “The cherry taken in the character of a single image was frequently the have affection for-cherry;as such it survives today in American unauthorized language as ‘the maidenhead’ . Erotic intension was there for the makar to conversion to an act if he wished. But the cherry was angelic fruit. It was the object of hankering in the Mother of God in the presence of Christ was born-in the well known ‘Cherry tree Carol’ that is a mutation on the early legend of Mary and the age palm on the flight to Egypt…There was that in the kind of the cherry, the white and red of it’s muscle and fat and juice, that could eloquently outline the body and blood of Christ, of the sacrament.”
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Song, Dance and Poetry of the Court of Scotland Under King James VI By Helena Mennnie Shire, Cambridge University Press, 2010

       “I be in actual possession of also usually administered at the similar time tablespoonful doses, two or three ages a day, of a decoction of violent-cherry bark and sanguinaria, which, in cases allied with debility of the stomach, be pleased rarely fail to produce highly beneficial goods, and should be continued for more time after the healthy secretion of the liver has been restored. Its energy upon the biliary secretion obviates the destiny for constantly resorting to cathartics, and it should at no time be neglected except in those cases presenting prove of gastric irritation, when the royal line-root should be omitted and the cherry bark be given alone.”
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American Eclectic wont of Medicine, Volume 2, by Ichabod Gibson Jones, 1858

 Felter, H. W. The Eclectic Materia Medica, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, J.K. Scudder, 1922 -Quote The American Eclectic Materia Medica, ~ means of Lorenzo Elbridge Jones, 1863 “Infuse Barberry yelp, Wild-cherry bark and American Aspen, four ounces of both, in one gallon of cider notwithstanding forty-eight hours in a covered ves- sel, maintaining a meek heat: one gill may be taken four or five general condition of affairs daily, in jaundice and torpid states of the liver.”

 References  
    A TEXT-BOOK MATERIA MEDICA, THERAPEUTICS, AND PHARMACOLOGY. GEORGE FRANK BUTLER, Ph.g.. M.D., , 1896.

    American Eclectic Practice of Medicine, Volume 2, by Ichabod Gibson Jones, 1858.

 American Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Pharmacognosy JOHN URI LLOYD, Ph.M, 1915.

 “BRIT – Native American Ethnobotany Database.” BRIT – Native American Ethnobotany Database. Accessed September 29, 2016. http://naeb.brit.org/uses/pry into/?string=Prunus serotina.

 By William and Robert Whistlecraft, of Stowmarket, in Suffolk, Harness and Collar-Makers. Intended to Comprise the Most Interesting Particulars Relating to King Arthur and His Round Table. Bath: H. E. Carrington, 1842.

“Post-Medieval Arthurian Literature in English (Other than Fiction): A Preliminary Bibliography | Robbins Library Digital Projects.” Post-Medieval Arthurian Literature in English (Other than Fiction): A Preliminary Bibliography | Robbins Library Digital Projects. Accessed September 29, 2016.

http://d.lib.rochester.edu/camelot/body /lupack-post-medieval-arthurian-literature.

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Buy Wild Cherry Bark Tincture, Prunus serotina

Culpeper, Nicholas. The English Physician Enlarged: With Three Hundred and Sixty-nine Medicines, Made of English Herbs, That Were Not in Any Impression Until This. Being ~y Astrologo-physical Discourse of the Vulgar Herbs of This Nation, … By Nich. Culpepper. .. London: printed for W. Baynes, 1799.

 Jo. Conversation, Field Notes. Tucson, AZ, 2015. John Slattery, Sonoran Desert Apprentice

Mich. Conversations. Silver City, New Mexico, 2015. Field mention in speaking Michael Cottingham, Voyage Botanical Herbal Medicine Program

 Felter, H. W. The Eclectic Materia Medica, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, J.K. Shudder, 1922.

 Moore, Michael. Medicinal Plants Mountain West. 2012

 Prunus Virginiana— Pruni Virginianae—Wild Cherry. U. S. P. Song,

Dance and Poetry of the Court of Scotland Under King James VI By Helena Mennnie Shire, Cambridge University Press, 2010. The American Eclectic Materia Medica, ~ means of Lorenzo Elbridge Jones, 1863.

I had the wish, let it dry emotion, conscientiously , and I meditation the death over and over and across and walked slowly of this highway and on the other, inexorably, to them and related, “is a string that led me through I’m not pulling maze.

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